Dropbox? Python.

Love it.  Dropbox uses python, scaling to 175 million users.

Also interesting:

The team also found it was easier to keep log data rather than delete old code – usually there would be a need for it later on for whatever reason. “Delete nothing unless necessary,” said Eranki. A major conclusion of those early days: Be sceptical about adopting new technology.

Confluence

Just hosted a Join.Me session directly into a VMWare virtual machine on my machine. Didn’t have to clean up (my desktop) for company. Love the confluence of technologies.

Python is addictive

Been a while since I’ve felt this way, but Python brought it back out. Python programming is pretty addictive. I find myself pondering the next little Python ditty to whip up, and going through  withdrawal without it. Gotta get my Python fix!

If you’re a developer who can taste a good design, a good implementation, you know what I mean.

Of course, there are plenty of things I wouldn’t write in Python.

 

Boost Inside

Snooping in the QuickBooks 2013 installation directory, I find a couple boost libraries:

  • boost_regex-vc90-mt-p-1_33.dll
  • boost_serialization-vc90-mt-1_35.dll
  • boost_serialization-vc90-mt-1_33.dll

Not a lot of boost, but some.  And they’re a few years old, but still fine.

 

 

Downsides of SaaS

Software-as-a-Service has its downsides, as one commenter notes:

We’re beginning to see the pitfalls of software-as-a-service in general: loss of control for for the user, increased security risks, and being entirely at the mercy of the providers’ future business strategies.

The context is Google discontinuing its RSS Reader.

A small outfit has motivation that a big one doesn’t. It matters not just to the provider, but the user. Opportunity abounds.

 

Downsides of Collaboration

Here’s an outstanding video on how collaboration can not only kill creativity, but dupe our very perceptions. Steve Wozniak:

Most inventors and engineers I have met are like me: they’re shy and they live in their heads. They’re almost like artists. In fact, the very best of them are artists. And artists work best alone where they can control an invention’s design without a lot of other people designing it for marketing or some other committee. I don’t believe anything revolutionary has ever been invented by committee. If you’re that rare engineer who is an inventor and also an artist, I’m going to give you some advice that might be hard to take. That advice is: work alone. You’re going to be best able to design revolutionary products and features if you’re working on your own. Not on a committee. Not on a team.

And it gets better from here.

You’ll undoubtedly apply it to situations closest to your heart.  It resonates with me and the software I write. Of course we can’t just make up our own requirements, but the final product needs to come from you.

I also hear a call to courage. Don’t be arrogant, but stand your ground. Use your best judgment. Don’t be dulled–or let your project be dulled–by the strongest personalities in the room.

Thoughts?

 

 

“I am a terrible programmer”

That provocative title from Dan Shipper:

Part of me is thinking: in some ways, you were a terrible programmer
Other part is, well … it’s worked perfectly for the last 20 months and I’ve never had to touch it.

Like most things in life, the answer to what a good coder is, is somewhere in between the guy who wants to get it out fast and the guy who wants to make it beautiful.

His post-script is also a profound trueism in software:

P.S. In my defense, the find_art.js file that Scott was referencing was supposed to be a prototype. They weren’t sure if people would actually use the feature and wanted to test it. It ended up being so popular that they left it in!